Catalog Search  

July and Tesla

Born in July 1856, Nikola Tesla was a brilliant student in his home country. After coming to America, the Serbian-American worked with Thomas Edison before starting his own projects. Although famous for creating the AC current and battling the current war with Edison, Tesla was the creator of many successful inventions and patents. Many of these inventions are still being used and improved on today. This July you can do your own Tesla reading and research and discover the man behind the inventions.

Nikola Tesla: Physicist, Inventor, Electrical Engineer

by Michael Burgan

Revolutionary inventor and engineer Nikola Tesla has been called the father of the 20th century. The eccentric physicist developed the alternating current electric power system that lights up the world today. He also invented radio and had to spend years proving it. Tesla hoped the world would find peace and riches through his inventions. Even with his great intelligence, he had trouble finding either of those in his own life.


My inventions : the autobiography of Nikola Tesla

by Nikola Tesla

Serbian inventor Nikola Tesla (1857-1943) was a revolutionary scientist who forever changed the scientific fields of electricity and magnetism. Tesla's greatest invention, A/C current, powers almost all of the technological wonders in the world today, from home heating to computers to high-tech robotics. His discoveries gave mankind the television. And his dream of wireless communication came to pass in both the radio and eventually the cell phone. Yet his story remains widely unknown. Anyone who has ever dared to dream big will find the life of Nikola Tesla, written in his own words, engaging, informative, and humorous in its eccentricity.

 

AC/DC The Savage Tale of the First Standards War

by Tom McNichol

Long before there was VHS versus Betamax, Windows versus Macintosh, or Blu-Ray versus HD-DVD, the first and nastiest standards war was fought over how electricity would be transmitted around the world: alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). The savage showdown between AC and DC changed the lives of billions of people, shaped the modern technological age, and set the stage for all standards wars to follow. 

 

War of the currents : Thomas Edison vs. Nikola Tesla

by Stephanie Sammartino McPherson

Inventor Thomas Edison already had a leading role in the industry: he had invented the first reliable electrical lightbulb. By 1882 his Edison Electric Light Company was distributing electricity using a system called direct current, or DC. But an inventor named Nikola Tesla challenged Edison, Tesla believed that an alternating current-or AC-system would be better. Edison believed that public opinion would be the only way to win the battle. This battle over which system would become standard became known as the War of the Currents. This book tells the story of that war and the ways in which both kinds of electric power changed the world.

 

Electrical wizard : how Nikola Tesla lit up the world

by Elizabeth Rusch

Here is the story of the ambitious young man who brought life-changing ideas to America, despite the obstructive efforts of his hero-turned-rival, Thomas Edison. From using alternating current to light up the Chicago World’s Fair to harnessing Niagara to electrify New York City and beyond, Nikola Tesla was a revolutionary ahead of his time. Remote controls, fluorescent lights, X-rays, speedometers, cell phones, even the radio — all resulted from Nikola Tesla’s inventions. 

 

The invention of everything else

by Samantha Hunt

It is 1943, and the renowned inventor Nikola Tesla occupies a forbidden room on the 33rd floor of the Hotel New Yorker, stealing electricity. Louisa, a young maid at the hotel determined to befriend him, wins his attention through a shared love of pigeons; with her we hear his tragic and tremendous life story unfold. A masterful hybrid of history, biography, and science fiction, The Invention of Everything Else is an absorbing story about love and death and a wonderfully imagined homage to one of history's most visionary scientists.

 

The five fists of science

by Matt Fraction

In 1899, Mark Twain and Nikola Tesla decided to end war forever. With Twain's connections and Tesla's inventions, they went into business selling world peace. So, what happened? Only now can the tale be told - in which Twain and Tesla collided with Edison and Morgan, an evil science cabal merging the Black Arts and the Industrial Age. Turn of the century New York City sets the stage for a titanic battle over the very fate of mankind.

 

Tesla's attic

by Neal Shusterman

After their home burns down, fourteen-year-old Nick, his younger brother, and their father move into a ramshackle Victorian house they've inherited. When Nick opens the door to his attic room, he's hit in the head by a toaster. That's just the beginning of his weird experiences with the old junk stored up there. After getting rid of the odd antiques in a garage sale, Nick befriends some local kids-Mitch, Caitlin, and Vincent-and they discover that all of the objects have extraordinary properties. What's more, Nick figures out that the attic is a strange magnetic vortex, which attracts all sorts of trouble. It's as if the attic itself has an intelligence . . . and a purpose.

FacebookTwitterDiggDeliciousReddit
Pin It

Staff Link - Developed by the Pioneer Virtual Library, Powered by Joomla! - Pioneer Library System 300 Norman Center Court, Norman OK 73072